Educator wellbeing centre opens in rural Queensland town of Emerald

by Freya Lucas

October 11

Queensland Education Minister Grace Grace has officially opened the Centre for Learning and Wellbeing in Emerald this week, as part of the Queensland Government’s commitment to supporting teachers in the bush.

 

More than 630 Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) services are located in rural and remote areas of Queensland, making the support services of equal value to the ECEC sector also. 

 

Ms Grace officially launched the Centre yesterday before visiting staff and students at Emerald North State School, the Borilla Community Kindy and Emerald State High School.

 

The Centres for Learning and Wellbeing, of which the Emerald site is one, are a key part of the Queensland Government’s $100 million Advancing rural and remote education strategy.

 

To create the centre, over $600,000 was spent refurbishing a building at Emerald North State School, supporting two construction jobs in the process. Further jobs creation was supported with the Centre hosting 10 new positions, with staff supporting a network of 43 state schools in Central Queensland.

 

Ms Grace said the aim of the Centre was to mentor beginning teachers, coach experienced teachers and build resilience in staff who’ve just moved to a regional area.

 

“We want to retain and attract quality teachers in regional Queensland, but we can’t do that without providing the right support and professional development,” she said, adding that the Centres also also offer links to support services so that staff, children and families can access the assistance they need.

 

Ms Grace said the Centre was in good hands with Principal Leisa Neaton, who previously worked at Frenchville State School in Rockhampton.

 

Ms Neaton said the Emerald Centre was making a difference in the community, adding that since the centre opened in July “I can already see the benefits of the programs we run for Central Queensland staff” 

 

“Being able to offer this kind of coaching and mentoring to remote and rural staff is great for their professional development and, ultimately, student outcomes.”

 

For more information on rural and remote education, visit the website

PRINT