Educator wellbeing and mental health a focus point on World Mental Health Day

by Freya Lucas

October 10

More than 700 organisations, companies, community groups and charities are taking part in World Mental Health Day today, including a World Record Attempt in Wagga Wagga to raise awareness and reduce stigma in the field of mental health.

 

The “Do You See What I See?” campaign encourages people to make a #MentalHealthPromise and shed a more positive light on mental health in a bid to reduce stigma for the one in five Australians who are affected by mental illness annually.

 

 

With the care and education of children in the early years having been acknowledged as a high demand and complex educational environment, it is timely to consider, on World Mental Health Day, the contributing factors which impact on the mental health and wellbeing of education and care professionals.

 

 

Work environment, income, societal status and differentiation between job description and actual practices have all been noted in research as factors which impact on mental health and wellbeing.

 

 

The importance of professional resilience for early years educators has been highlighted by KidsMatter, and the Start Well project has likewise identified resilience as important to maximise the social and emotional wellbeing of early childhood educators.

 

 

Mental Health Australia CEO Frank Quinlan said the 10/10 initiative has seen a huge increase in participation of workplaces over the last two years, and that the organisation encourages people to shed a more positive light on mental health at work.

 

“We know from our recent Investing to Save report with KPMG that investment in workplace initiatives could save the nation more than $4.5 billion, and to see some of the biggest employers in the country engage with this year’s campaign, is a clear sign that people are becoming more and more aware of just how important it is to look after mental health and wellbeing in the workplace.” Mr Quinlan said.

 

For more information about creating mentally healthy ECEC workplaces, visit beyondblue, mindmatters or KidsMatter

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