Healthy Towns for Healthy Children a priority for South Australia

Healthy Towns for Healthy Children a priority for South Australia

by Freya Lucas

September 13, 2021

Children and young people in regional towns will benefit from a $750,000 investment in their health and wellbeing thanks to a new round of the SA Healthy Towns Challenge which opened last Friday.

 

Wellbeing SA Chief Executive Lyn Dean said childhood wellbeing is among the agency’s highest priorities, with these grants designed to address the various risk factors, environments and policies that influence outcomes for children.

 

“We want to ensure all South Australian children have the best start in life and are given every opportunity to thrive,” Ms Dean said.

 

“These grants are designed to help communities take early action and reduce the preventable burden of disease and injury in children in their town.”

 

South Australia’s Minister for Health and Wellbeing Stephen Wade outlined that the new round of the Challenge will offer grants of up to $125,000 per year over two years to up to three towns or regions across the state.

 

“The SA Healthy Towns Challenge is a grants program for regional and rural towns to support preventive health and wellbeing approaches within their community,” he explained.

 

The SA Government previously invested $1 million through the Challenge, with the Marshall Liberal demonstrating its commitment to the health and wellbeing of regional South Australians through the additional $750,000 boost, which is available for community-led projects that will support the wellbeing of children through the creation of healthier environments.

 

Eligible towns are required to be within the six South Australian regional Local Health Network areas and applications must be made with a co-investment and in partnership with local community organisations.

 

Applications for the SA Healthy Towns Challenge – Partnering for Children’s Wellbeing are open until Friday 15 October.

 

To find out more and apply, please see here

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