Cobargo preschool celebrates the creation of a new Eco-Island collaboration | Sector

Cobargo preschool celebrates the creation of a new Eco-Island collaboration

by Freya Lucas

May 17, 2021

The children of Cobargo Preschool will enjoy spending time with birds, bees and butterflies following the creation of an ‘eco island’ which used the capacity of more than 70 volunteers to create an oasis for the children to use as part of the Growing Growers program.

 

Growing Growers is aimed at engaging preschool children with the flora and fauna in their local ecosystem, with preschool alumni, now students at Narooma High School, keen to lend a hand to support the young learners to have a strong sustainable start. 

 

The creation of the eco-island began on Saturday 8 May with support from special guests including Paul West, of River Cottage Australia and Costa Georgiadis of Gardening Australia, along with many locals who were keen to get involved.

 

Located in the middle of the preschool bus’ turning circle, the eco-island is a 120 square metre terraced bird, bee and butterfly hub, enhanced with native species. It features 15 ‘bush poles’, at the top of which are bird homes or bee hotels, designed to attract animals to the location. 

 

Over the coming months the Narooma High School students will help in the gardens and participate in a program with the preschoolers, aimed at promoting intergenerational collaboration.

 

Plants for the garden were selected by Merryn Carey from South Coast Flora and many of the wooden habitat boxes were created by Two Sheds Woodwork For Women.

 

The project, which is being overseen by permaculture teacher Dan Bakker is one of many which will be carried out at the preschool, however the eco-island is the centrepiece. 

 

Funding for the project has come primarily from the Cobargo Community Bushfire Recovery Fund with donations and grants collected by the group contributing directly to its implementation.

 

Speaking with local publication Bega District News Cobargo Preschool director Christine McKnight, said the experience was a rewarding one for children and their families.

 

The eco-island, and the special guests who came to work with the community to create it, has provided a boost in morale for all those involved, she continued, especially as the community recovers from the trauma of recent bushfires. 

 

The garden, she continued, is an acknowledgement of “the resilience of our natural environment and our community”.

 

“The children are enjoying being involved in the planning and development of the garden area, learning about the animals and insects and feeling part of a real and productive project supporting sustainability and recovery,” Ms McKnight concluded. 

 

To read the original coverage of this story, please see here

PRINT