Popular preschool TV favourite wins Logie and shatters viewing records

Popular preschool TV favourite wins Logie and shatters viewing records

by Freya Lucas

July 04, 2019

The team behind the hit Australian television series Bluey, which has struck a cord with many young children around the country, are celebrating a week of huge success, winning a Logie award, and reaching 100 million plays on ABC iView. 

 

The episode Calypso, depicts a day in the life of an early childhood education and care setting, showing an educator character supporting child characters who are engaged in imaginative socio-dramatic play. 

 

Created by Griffith Film School alumnus Joe Brumm, Bluey has proved wildly popular with families across the nation, becoming the ABC’s most watched show ever.

 

The show won Most Outstanding Children’s Program at last weeks Logie Awards, with Mr Brumm thanking the show’s many fans for being so supportive. 

 

Image courtesy Ludo Studios

The series showcases the talents of many of Queensland based Griffith University graduates, being produced by Emmy award-winning Ludo Studio, which co-founded by fellow Griffith Film School alumnus Daley Pearson, and the show employing Griffith animation graduates.

 

The creative team behind Bluey recently signed a deal with Disney Junior and Disney+ that will see the show go global. They have partnered with Moose Toys to produce a range of books and toys and are also in discussions to create a live play based on the show.

 

Mr Pearson recently told Sky News that the team were “determined to make sure the show stayed true to its roots.”

 

“This is definitely the biggest thing that’s happened to any of us, but we want everything that goes out to be as good as the show,” he said.

 

“It’s about following our natural instincts that made the show a success in the first place.”

 

Mr Brumm, who previously worked on BAFTA-award winning kids shows Charlie and Lola and Peppa Pig, created Bluey after watching his daughters at play.

“It’s fascinating seeing how much they learn from devising and playing their own games. Bluey is a celebration of the role imaginative play has in shaping healthy kids,” he said.

Wanting to showcase universal themes of family and fun in a recognisably Australian setting, Mr Brumm said the scenes depicted in Bluey – hilly suburban streets, backyard swimming pools -were reflective of the life of a child growing up in Queensland. 

 

“These artists have taken everything beautiful about Brisbane and put it on the screen to make a truly Australian show.” Mr Pearson said. 

 

More than half of the team behind Bluey have been Griffith University graduates, Griffith Film School Animation Program director Dr Peter Moyes said, adding that the course attracted people who have a genuine desire to go into the industry.

 

“For a long time there were only a couple of animation studios in Brisbane, but there has been a real upsurge in the industry, with a dedicated children’s channel on the ABC and streaming services like Netflix and Stan.

 

“It’s a bonus that people can stay in Brisbane and find meaningful work in the industry.” Dr Moyes said in closing. 

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