ECTs recognised in National Framework for Teacher Registration for the first time

by Jason Roberts

September 27, 2018

The Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL) has completed its review of the National Framework for Teacher Registration and the Teacher Standards.

 

AITSL has recommended that “all early childhood teachers (ECTs) in Australia regardless of their employment setting be required to be registered by teacher regulatory authorities, under a consistent national approach.”

 

The AITSL report outlines that different state jurisdictions have applied to different models to the registration of early childhood teachers. Although the majority of ECTs are registered, some jurisdictions only register ECTs employed in school settings and not those employed in centre or family day care settings.

 

It goes on to note that this important cohort of the teaching profession is currently inconsistently recognised.

 

In addition, the panel has agreed to update the language used in the Teacher Standards to include early childhood practice and employment settings.

 

At the formation of the National Framework for Teacher Registration in 2011 the new framework did not include any reference to the treatment of ECTs.

 

Chris Wardlaw PSM, deputy chair of the AITSL, stated that “a significant opportunity exists to extend the benefits of the registration system to all ECTs” and that “embedding teacher Standards in the professional endeavours of ECTs will support the continuing journey of professionalism for this critically important sector.

 

The independent expert panel appointed to conduct the review was made up of 10 individuals from across the early childhood and school sectors including Gabrielle Sinclair, Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Children’s Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA).

 

Mr Wardlaw confirmed the reach of the review when he said that “The Panel undertook a deliberately consultative and iterative process. We visited each jurisdiction, meeting face to-face with over 140 key stakeholders. We received 94 written submissions, and crucially, heard from over 6,500 teachers and leaders through an online survey.”

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