LATEST STORIES

New report outlines concerns that single mothers/children will be forced back to poverty

The role that affordable, high-quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) plays in supporting children growing up in families led by single mothers has been highlighted in a new report from social justice organisation Brotherhood of St. Laurence ahead of upcoming changes to the coronavirus supplement, expected to impact 1.1 million Australian children.

4 days

by Freya Lucas

New analysis finds that enhanced ECEC investment will help women and the economy

A new analysis, undertaken by Associate Professor Elizabeth Hill from the University of Sydney’s Department of Political Economy, has found that an enhanced investment in ‘care’ sectors such as early childhood education and care (ECEC) and health will simultaneously help women and the economy as Australia looks to recover from COVID-19.

1 week

by Freya Lucas

Communities@Work freezes fees for the remainder of 2020 as COVID-19 continues

ACT provider Communities@Work has announced that fees across the organisation's early education centres and out of school hours care services will be unchanged in the next four months, and that no fee increase to the service levy paid by educators to Communities@Work will be applied.

2 weeks

by Freya Lucas

KPMG report praised by the broader ECEC sector - ‘There’s never been a better time’

Yesterday’s KPMG report, The child care subsidy: Options for increasing support for caregivers who want to work, has drawn praise from much of the early childhood education and care (ECEC), with peak body Early Childhood Australia (ECA) saying “there has never been a better time” to address the recommendations made in the report and make early learning more accessible.

2 weeks

by Freya Lucas

KPMG analysis shows CCS optimisation could nudge the economy “back on track”

New analysis from KPMG has yielded insights into the costs and benefits of making changes to the child care subsidy (CCS) system, noting that eliminating the per-child subsidy caps, increasing the maximum subsidy for the lowest income families, and provisioning for every child to attract some federal government subsidy could result in an annual boost of $5.4 billion to GDP.

2 weeks

by Freya Lucas

Load More